Thursday, July 23, 2015

Project 365 - Days 181 - 200. Wow. I've stuck with it so far!

Summer has settled in with a searing vengeance in the Pacific Northwest. The 'Blob'; an ocean phenomenon created by El Niño and exacerbated by Climate Change, has brought hot dry weather to Oregon in spades; creating a drought that may well harm crops, and has already affected water levels throughout the pacific northwest. It's hot. It's dry. Mount Hood looks like it normally looks in late August. It's icky and I hate it. I've been huddled in the house in my vampire skin, wishing for Autumn with all my might. I've been trying to write between being used as a human jungle-gym and repeating the sink to dishwasher cycle for the five billionth time this week.

Other than that, things have been reasonably quiet. I've been prepping my authory stuff for some shows and conventions I am participating in with a fellow author, and trying to finish a book for release.  In fact, I'm procrastinating working on it right now by blogging here.  So let's get to my next collection of pictures for these past 20 days. It's been a time of mostly peaceful house-dwelling.

181/365 - Bad quality, but it had to be taken.
This is my son literally standing on his
father's head.

182/365 - More grain texture. It was so pretty. And it's delicious
too. Trader Joe's couscous blend.

183/365 - This would be my favourite photo of all time, if it weren't for the
disgusting hairs from Simon stuck all over my kid and on his lips.
Summer also brings the joy of shedding. And when you have a dog that
looks like a walking piece of Flokati rug, you're going to have a lot
of hair.

184/365 - He's outgrown his baby dish and mug. I took this shot to post it
on the garage sale page. My sister gave me these years and years ago,
in anticipation of my having a child. I've had them all this time.
He hardly used them.

185/365 - Doughnut peach has a strange, mysterious blemish on its skin.
Wonder who the culprit could be?

186/365 - This is a photo of the sky taken from the reflection on the hood
of a clean Prius. Just because.

187/365 - Randomness

188/365 - Textures and colours

189/365 - Old man's beard looks a little
anemic with all this dry air.

190/365 - Iron Horse

191/365 - Having a bit of vino in the late
afternoon while Alex plays on Fort
Alexander. I was braising beef in
wine, and opened a half-bottle. So,
I decided to drink the difference.

192/365 - Sandy Mountain Festival.
My son, climbing a rock wall. Yes.
He did. The National Guardsmen
were impressed.

193/365 - I suspect they must be dyeing
some of these blossoms.
Still a riot of colour.

194/365 - My husband's successful anti-bear campaign. It worked. No more
bear raids of the garbage have occurred since this sign went up.

195/365 - Hammie and Alex enjoy a little playtime. He loves his
new hamster friend, and must have 'hammie-time' every day. And yes,
I do start rapping "Hammie time" when he asks.

196/365 - The boy rarely naps these days. This day, he passed out in the crook
of my arm. Those eyelashes slay me.

197/365 - A visit to the doctor for both of us.

198/365 - Reflections

199/365 - Mmmmmmmmmmms

200/365 - My husband's old '50 Chevvy five-window truck. It belonged
to his great grandfather. Someday, I hope we will be able to afford
for him to restore it.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Project 365 - Days 161 - 180 Summer days begin

161/365 - White bleeding hearts

162/365 - Old wood stove and chimney on
nearby property.

163/365 - A visit to the old boarding
facility. Doing some web-work for the
owner, if I can pin her down for content.

I won't lie. It was tough being there. I miss
my horse.

164/365 - Tea-cake in the works

165/365 - Alex is obsessed with the old
green truck. Loves it more than
Fort Alexander.

166/365 - Big leaf maple leaves are big.

167/365 - Making good use of overripe
bananas. 

168/365

169/365 - Gettin' the stare-down

170/365 - Peacock feathers

171/365 - The walking Flokati enjoying the sun.

172/365 - I stacked a little rock tower. There are two kinds
of people in this world; people who would leave this alone,
and people who would knock it over. I guess three kinds,
because there're the weirdos like me who build them.

173/365 - Huckleberries are well on their way.

174/365 - A special treat from my favourite sushi place (Sushi & Maki in Clackamas)
That roll in the front is the Florida Roll, which contains real crab, nori,
and is topped with tuna and thin sliced lemon for the most amazing flavour.

175/365 - A nice batch of spaghetti. It was
noms.

176/365 - Joined the local farm co-op, and
secured some fresh local eggs. So much
richer and yummier.

177/365 - A hamster plush in lacy shadow

178/365 - an abstract selfie?

179/365 - Meet Hammie (we might rename
him). He was at PetCo when we made
a routine stop. He was up for adoption
with his cage for $20. No way you can
beat that. Alex is naturally obsessed with
Hammie.

180/365 - I had to crop out and and remove what looked like the
carcass of a pupa. Looking this close at grain was
kind of disturbing. But the textures in the brown
rice were still beautiful. 

Friday, June 19, 2015

A Velvet Bonnet for Agnes

My bonnet-pattern testing phase is still going, although often interrupted by other things. I was blazing away on this project when mom died, so I've only just gotten back to finishing it.  One of my friends from the ORS (she now leads in the WRS group) asked that I make her a bonnet/hat with a triangular top. She asked me this eons ago when I made another one that ended up being super small. She sent me all the supplies for covering and decorating, and it idled on top of my bedroom closet for months.

But finally, when I made the capote bonnet, I decided since I had everything else out, I would go ahead and design this bonnet for her.


The basic frame, assembled. I started with a paper mock up, then a
poster-board model. I used that to cut the buckram.
I wired both ends of the pipe and the outer edge of the brim.
I then shaped the wire into a triangle. Carefully.

I cut the top cap accordingly. Don't mind the small photo-bomber.


It's a little big on the head, which is a good thing. The last one barely fit
her, so that was a problem. LOL.

I put bias tape on the edge of the brim and the top of the hat to avoid
any unsightly wire eventually wearing through.



I hand sewed everything, but for this part, I did cheat and used
rubber cement to affix it there. Sue me.

I then added mulling. I whip stitched most of it in place. I lined the
outer bonnet. 
Then it was just a matter of covering and decorating it.  Agnes sent me some velvet, some moire ribbon that was really wide, some pale slate blue ribbon, an assortment of feathers, and some embroidered thistles.  I tried to use everything in a tasteful way.

I made the feathers into a separate bundle with a ribbon base that can be pinned to the hat, or removed as desired. There is a lovely black ostrich feather, and several small peacock feathers. 

I made some cockades wherein I added little pouffes made from the embroidered thistle.

The most time-consuming bit was the line on the inside of the brim. It is a line of the same ribbon, which frayed. I then stitched a little silver border along both sides to neaten it up. The silver is also repeated in the ruched ribbon chevron on the front of the bonnet.






If I hadn't run out of the blue riboon, I might have taken the ruching
all the way 'round the back between the two cockades too.


You can see, the feathers can be removed.

It's difficult to see, but the inner brim is ruched. I lined the inside of the
hat with the wide moire ribbon, which is black.



All in all, I think it's a lovely bonnet. I kept it simpler, because it is the kind of bonnet you want to add stuff to. I hope Agnes likes it. She waited long enough for it. Sorry Agnes. :)  I think this pattern is a win. I might do several top-shape options on it, as well as a variety of brim-styles.

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